Expedition – The Setting We’re Using

For the curious, below you will find the text of a document I handed out to my players during our second session, attempting to nail down some setting elements in our game of Expedition. It’s pretty standard fare, and not too comprehensive, but there you go.

Expedition RPG: Our Setting Primer

The Bastion of Sorrow

Things are not so good in the Bastion of Sorrow. Once it was known as the Kingdom of Tremont, until the death of Queen Fylla IV, when the Dark Storm came. The Storm left only ruin in its wake, and the land has never truly recovered.

Still, people eke out a living as best they can. The Bastion of Sorrow is a land of exiles, criminals, and downtrodden folk. Humans and ogres are found in abundance, sharing an uneasy peace. Elves, however, wish to see nature finish off what it started so long ago with the Dark Storm, and their kind has plagued the people of the Bastion for years.

Several times throughout the years there have been rumors of the last heirs of Tremont, but all claimants have proved to be pretenders.

Lacrimose

The small town of Lacrimose is deep within the Bastion, on the edges of its less savory parts. Most of the townsfolk are craftspeople or smugglers, and import their food and raw materials in exchange for what passes as good craftsmanship. Sometimes they just steal it.

Temple of Kardif – Kardif is the god of the lost, and therefore enjoys a reasonable following in Lacrimose. The temple is a ramshackle structure, occupying what was once a barn. Still, it has a certain aura of reverence about it. The priests and volunteers from the town make sure it doesn’t fall in on itself, holy symbols are present, and they hold services twice a week. A lot of random knick-knacks find their way to the temple, and so if the owners are not found, the clergy distributes them as needed to the populace.

The Royal Urchin – Lacrimose’s watering hole. Friday is poker night.

Castle Barderin

Castle Barderin existed before the rulers of Tremont came into power, and did not become the seat of the nobility. It is an old place, though it was kept in reasonable repair by members of the royal family before the Dark Storm, serving as a kind of getaway for when the pressures of the capital grew too great.

Barderin was not built with luxury in mind. It is a spartan place, despite the efforts of the nobility to make it habitable. Nowadays it is crumbling and ruined. Naturally there are rumors it is haunted, but the truth of those tales is difficult to discern. Elves have made Barderin a base of operations in the area, and they are both feared and despised far more than rumors of ghosts.

Advertisements